Reading:
WHAT IS Full Wave Rectifier

WHAT IS Full Wave Rectifier

A diode circuit called the NFull Wave Rectifier is used to convert the entire cycle of Alternating Voltage (AC Supply) to Direct Voltage (DC Supply).

For the entirety of the input AC Supply cycle, in full wave rectification, current flows through the load in the same direction.

Types of Full Wave Rectifiers

Full Wave Bridge Rectifier Centre Tap Full Wave Rectifier The circuit of a center tap full wave rectifier is made up of the following main components: two diodes; a centre-tapped transformer; a load resistance.

Positive Half Cycle of the Center-Tap FWR Circuit During the positive half cycle of the input AC voltage, the secondary winding’s end A becomes positive and the end B becomes negative. As a result, diode D1 is biased forward, making it a closed switch, and diode D2 is biased backward, making it an open switch. As a result, current travels from P to O through the load (RL).

Negative Half Cycle During the input AC supply’s negative half cycle, the secondary winding’s end B becomes positive and the end A becomes negative. This makes the diode D2 forward one-sided (behaves like shut switch) and the diode D1 invert one-sided (goes about as open switch). As a result, the lower half of the secondary winding, load RL, and diode D2 will carry the current from

Note that the ongoing through the heap is in similar heading for both half patterns of information AC supply. This results in DC output across the load.

The output frequency of the center tap FWR is twice that of the input frequency. Because the supply at the input is a sine wave that repeats every 2 radians, Pulsating DC is the output of FWR, and it repeats the same pattern twice every 2 radians as the input AC.

fout=2fin The diodes must have a peak inverse voltage, which is one of the drawbacks of the center-tap FWR.
On the secondary winding, it is difficult to locate the center tap.
The use of a full wave bridge rectifier eliminates the requirement for a center tapped transformer. It is a bridge made up of four diodes connected together.

The following are the primary components of the full wave bridge rectifier’s circuit: four diodes; a step down transformer; load resistance

The Center-Tap FWR Circuit’s Operation

Positive Half Cycle During the input AC voltage’s positive half cycle, the secondary winding’s end A becomes positive and the end B becomes negative. As a result, diode D1 is biased forward, making it a closed switch, and diode D2 is biased backward, making it an open switch. As a result, current travels from P to O through the load (RL).

Negative Half Cycle During the negative half cycle, the secondary winding’s end A changes into a negative value and the end B becomes a positive value. As a result, diodes D1 and D3 are biased in the opposite direction—much like an open switch—while diodes D2 and D4 are biased in the opposite direction. Through diode D2, load RL, and diode D4, current flows from B to A.

For both input AC supply cycles, therefore, the current flows in the same direction through load RL. As a result, DC output is produced throughout the load.

Advantages of Bridge FWR: For the same secondary voltage, its output is twice as big as that of a center tap full wave rectifier.

Center-tapped transformers are unnecessary.

The PIV of a full wave bridge rectifier is half that of a Centre-Tap FWR for the same DC output.

The drawbacks of the Bridge FWR are that it needs four diodes.

The two diodes that conduct are in series with each half cycle of the AC input, resulting in a voltage drop in the diodes’ internal resistance.

Did you find this article helpful?
1 out of 1 found this helpful
Still have questions? Open a Support Ticket


0 Comments

Leave a Reply

Arrow-up

Book Your Free Session Now

Fill in the form below to book a 30 min no-obligation consulting session.

we will reply within 24 hours.